You might be asking yourself what is an all-terrain tire? What makes them different and are those differences right for me? All-terrain tires (A/T tires) are designed to perform on-road and off-road. They provide maximum traction and comfort in wet, dry, and even in light snow. Call them a hybrid tire.

They perform adequately on the highway and in the mud. They can even be used on rocks. Think of the best tire you can buy to ride from your garage to the campsite. They will get you pretty much anywhere your truck can go.

How Long Do All-Terrain Tires Last On The Road?

20,000 to 40,000 miles. This entirely depends on the tire. Cheaper tires last closer to 20k miles while higher-end may last much longer. How you drive your car can also have an effect. Inflating a tire to the manufacturer’s recommended PSI will ensure you get the most out of your tires.

What Is The Difference Between All-Terrain And Highway Tires?

Tread void is the largest difference between all-terrain and highway tires. The tread void is the space between the teeth in the tire surface. All-terrain tires are designed to get the most traction in all driving conditions.

So sacrifices must be made to not give up too much in any one driving scenario. They will have to get as much grip on the blacktop and also have “teeth” cut into the tire so they can dig into the dirt and loose gravel and still get your bum moving.

READ MORE: WHAT ARE GOOD CHEAP ALL-TERRAIN TIRES?

Do they produce all-terrain vehicle tires? Yeah, but drivers use all-terrain tires on all types of surfaces, both on and off-road, for traction. These tires combine the open-tread style of an off-road tire to provide the grip of on-road tires. So, for those who on highways and paved roads, or only off-road, it’s not the best choice.

What About Road Noise?

One of the quietest all-terrain tires on the market is the Kumho Road Venture AT51. Its innovative tread design minimizes traffic noise. Then the upper shoulder design gives you an off-road edge your truck will appreciate. Off-roading with these tires will seem like you’re on concrete.

Do All-Terrain Tires Work In Snow?

All-weather tires have an aggressive tread pattern. They sport dense and chunky tread blocks to bite ice and snow. All-seasons, in turn, have a pattern of tread built for comfort and fuel economy. Thin and smooth rows of tread that slide on snow and ice.
 
Untreated rubber in all-season tires stiffens as temperatures drop. At temperatures below 45 degrees, harder rubber all-season tires start losing traction. Most people find this out the hard way, unfortunately. These tires become much less reliable for braking, accelerating, and cornering.

Are They Only Used On Trucks?

Do you drive an all-wheel-drive van? You can put all-terrain tires in a van. There is a rising number of individuals fitting their vans with all-terrain tires. Apart from giving your minivan a much more aggressive look, all-terrain tires provide extra traction and more safety for your family in slippery conditions.

Don’t forget if you have a teenager in the house learning to drive. If you camp or park on grassy fields, or drive muddy lanes daily, you can have some serious fun with a set of these tires.

What Is The Difference Between An All-Season Tire And An All-Weather Tire?

All-weather tires have an aggressive tread pattern with thick, chunky tread blocks to bite ice and snow for reliable winter grip and stability. All-seasons don’t. They have a tread pattern designed for comfort and fuel economy: small, smooth tread blocks that slide on snow and ice.

How Cold Is Too Cold For All Season Tires?

All-season rubber compounds stiffen as temperatures drop. By the time temperatures drop below 45 degrees, all-season tires are hard enough to begin losing traction. This makes braking, accelerating, and cornering less reliable.

Which Tires Are Better All-Season Or All-Weather?

In both the summer and winter seasons, all-weather tires work very well. They can also save you time and the hassle of changing out the tires. Buying two sets will only add stress. You have to store them, buy two sets, load them up, and maintain them.
 
The normal commuter needs tires for occasional extreme weather. But the majority of the time all-weather tires will do an excellent job. All-weather tires give you much better control in the winter than all-season tires. In the warmer months, all-terrain tires are comparable to your run of the mill winter tires.
Next articleWhat Are Good Cheap All-Terrain Tires?
Hi, I'm Ryne Sweeney, or, Mud Flap. I am a dedicated truck enthusiast. I like to argue about how Dodges are expensive pieces of metal and how Tesla will rule the world by 2030. One day I will start showering daily inside the house. My nights are long and my days are muddy.